Let’s Eliminate Waste, Fraud, and Abuse

Posted by Don Fullerton on Nov 5, 2010

Filed Under (Environmental Policy, Finance, Health Care, Other Topics, Retirement Policy, U.S. Fiscal Policy)

For the U.S. Federal Government, estimated receipts for the fiscal year 2010 are $2.381 trillion.  President Obama’s budget for 2010 adds up to $3.55 trillion; a difference in spending of $1.17 trillion.  That annual deficit is 49.2% of receipts!  Now that’s scary.  We’ve got to do something.  What we hear of course, is that we need to cut waste, fraud, and abuse.  No doubt about it; nobody in their right mind LIKES waste, fraud, and abuse.

So I went to find out how much of U.S. Federal government spending is on waste, fraud, and abuse.  For that purpose, of course, I turn to the best source for information that is accurate, unbiased, and objective.  I mean Wikipedia, of course.   On the Wikipedia entry for “2010 United States federal budget”, I see a breakdown for $2.184 trillion worth of “Mandatory Spending”:

  • $677.95 billion – Social Security
  • $571 billion – Other mandatory programs
  • $453 billion – Medicare
  • $290 billion – Medicaid
  • $164 billion – Interest on National Debt
  • $11 billion – Potential disaster costs

That $2.184 trillion of mandatory spending is 61.5% of the total $3.55 trillion of spending!   That MUST be spent, by law.  We can’t just renege on promised social security benefits or interest payments on the national debt.   And if it’s mandatory, it can’t include any waste, fraud and abuse.  So let’s keep looking for where to cut that waste, fraud, and abuse.  Here are some of the top categories for the remaining $1.368 trillion of spending, called “discretionary spending.”

  • $663.7 billion – Department of Defense (including Overseas Contingency Operations)
  • $78.7 billion – Department of Health and Human Services
  • $72.5 billion – Department of Transportation
  • $52.5 billion – Department of Veterans Affairs
  • $51.7 billion – Department of State and Other International Programs
  • $47.5 billion – Department of Housing and Urban Development
  • $46.7 billion – Department of Education
  • $42.7 billion – Department of Homeland Security
  • $26.3 billion – Department of Energy
  • $26.0 billion – Department of Agriculture
  • $23.9 billion – Department of Justice
  • $18.7 billion – National Aeronautics and Space Administration
  • $13.8 billion – Department of Commerce
  • $13.3 billion – Department of Labor
  • $13.3 billion – Department of the Treasury
  • $12.0 billion – Department of the Interior
  • $10.5 billion – Environmental Protection Agency

The biggest item ($663.7 billion) is defense spending, and we certainly can’t cut that during a war.  And that is 48.5% of all discretionary spending.  All of the rest of discretionary spending adds up to $704 billion, which is only 60.2% of the total $1.17 trillion of deficit.  In other words, even if we completely eliminated ALL discretionary spending other than defense, we’d still be stuck with 40% of the current deficit ($466 billion, or half a trillion dollars per year).  And that would mean zero spending on health and human services, zero on transportation, zero on veterans affairs, etc.

Still, however, it seems like we ought to be able to eliminate SOME of that spending, at least the spending on waste, fraud, and abuse.   So let’s look for that category.  Hmmm.  As I look down that entire list, I don’t SEE a category for waste, fraud, and abuse!

Okay, I’ll stop being sarcastic, but this does have a point.  Some very careful analysts might in fact be able to find some waste, fraud and abuse.  But that is much easier said than done, and it will be a tiny fraction of the deficit.  Any plan to get serious about cutting federal spending must make serious cuts in programs that are important to people, like welfare and transportation.  To eliminate the deficit will require changes in entitlements like Social Security and Medicare.

Moreover, we can’t substantially cut the deficit with only cuts in spending.  The categories listed above just cannot be cut enough to dent the deficit.  To eliminate the deficit, the only alternative is a combination of spending cuts and tax increases.  The new Congressional leaders do not want to increase taxes, of course, and I’m not saying they must.  Maybe we won’t close the deficit.  But just don’t tell me you’ll eliminate the federal deficit by cutting waste, fraud, and abuse.